Zim celebrates International Nurses Year

Zim celebrates International Nurses Year

Zim celebrates International Nurses Year

Zim celebrates International Nurses Year
This year Zimbabwe joined the world in commemorating the International Nurses and Midwives Day in May.
In this feature Tryfine Rachel Dzvukutu (TRD) speaks to the Vice Chairperson Health Service Board Professor Auxilia Chideme Munodawafa (Prof ACM)
TRD: What is the significance of such commemorations?
Prof ACM: This is the day that Nurses from all over the world celebrate the birth of Florence Nightingale 820–1910). “The Lady of the Lamp” as she is referred to in documented history. She is considered as the founder of modern nursing,while she was serving in the Crimean War in August 1856. She is known for her pioneering work in statistics, her social research approach to health, healthcare and hospital safety, as well as her contribution to sociological theory.
The 12th May, which is the day the International Day of Nurses is celebrated marks the contribution nurses make to society. The day has become more timely to celebrate considering the sacrifices nurses and all key health workers have made during the Covid-19 epidemic. Nurses provide care, support and treatment for the sick, the injured and the dying and support their families and communities.
Nurse midwives deliver new life into the world. Nurses, among other multiple roles teach people how to manage diabetes and other chronic conditions. They assess, monitor, and help treat patients’ critical needs as during the COVID-19 pandemic in ICU units. They detect illnesses, administer medicines, assist in surgeries, treat patients beyond the initial diagnosis, provide mental support and perform any number of other key roles hence the need to put aside a day in order to celebrate them
TRD: Under normal situations how do you suggest we celebrate such a noble profession and the work done by our nurses and midwives
Prof ACM: During the Pre Covid-19 era, the International Nurses Day, which is held in commemoration of the birth of the founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale, would be celebrated by nurses from all over the country coming together at a conference centre. The day would be marked by various activities for nurses to share and tell their stories per province and district level.
Nurses from various hospitals would prepare presentations of their different experiences of care giving and sharing with each other and replicate these elsewhere as appropriate.
Those nurses from the academic field would present research findings as a way of educating each other as well as excel in their academic field.
Usually there would be an invited quest from national, regional or international levels to come and share their experiences as a way of motivating nurses. Also, many retired nurses of all specialities were invited to come and share their experiences as a form of mentoring the young. There would also be a lot of motivational singing and dancing during these sessions.
This is a day that usually nurses let their hair down, forget the hard serious responsibilities of caring for a patient for a day and enjoy themselves.
It is hoped that post Covid-19 or in the new normal, such activities can resume.
TRD: Professor you served as a nurse and midwife for a long time. How would you describe the two professions and their centrality in the health sector.
Prof ACM: As far as the two professions are concerned, during my time, midwifery training was part and parcel of a nurse training. In fact, by the time one finished the general nursing, then would already be scheduled to proceed to midwifery. During my time, a nurse was considered “a half-baked nurse” if one did not possess a midwifery training. A nurse with general and midwifery training is considered a complete nurse that can be posted anywhere in the country and be able to function fully and deliver care to the whole family from birth…

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